Tag Archive for scabiosa

June in bloom in rain-drenched Connecticut

The first half of June dropped 10 inches of rain on my Connecticut garden, making the days leading up to June 2013 Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day soggy. Temperatures remain in the 50’s at night and 70’s during the day when, so often, the sun struggles to shine.

Lush greenery abounds throughout the rain-drenched gardens, dotted by shades of yellow, and blue, and shades of pink ranging from deep to pale to peachy tones.

Native Mountain Laurel, the Connecticut state flower, have been spectacular this year. They line and dot the edges of the woods surrounding our more cultivated land.

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In places, foxglove (digitalis, unknown variety) have self-sown along the woodland edge, particularly near my compost piles where seeds must have escaped when spent foxglove spires went into the compost.

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I don’t mind the self-sowing foxglove. Bees and hummingbirds love the flowers and deer leave the flowers and foliage alone.

Foxglove spires stand tall above yellow-blooming sedum that mimic the foliage of the small Spiraea ‘Double Play Gold’ in the foreground and Hakonechloa macra ‘Aureola’ at the far end. Blue-green Lady’s Mantle (Alchemilla mollis) and blue-silver Lamb’s ear (Stachys byzantina) contrast against these yellows and the yellow-green Hayscented fern that loves to spread from the woodland edges into my perennial beds.

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No matter the time of day these combinations provide a cheery view from the front porch and my office window and help transition into the area just beyond where I hope young viburnum, magnolia, kalmia, summersweet, juniper and clethra eventually form a shrub/small tree backdrop. But for now, ornamental grasses serve as backdrop foliage.

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Along the west side of the house, what I call the triangle bed is filled with a river of sedum surrounded by Rose campion (Lychnis coronaria), Lamb’s Ear, and Santolina in the foreground. I’ve planted many different combinations in this bed, many were plant combos deer have found quite yummy. But deer mostly leave this combo alone, only occasionally browsing the tops of yet-to-bloom veronica in the background.

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In the rear garden, totally fenced from deer, roses are the most prominent blooms at the moment. They seem happy to take over now that earlier iris have passed and later iris have yet to open.

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This peachy Star Rose is accompanied by nearly-open lavender blooms and nearby scabiosa.

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Further along in this long narrow bed blooms another Star Rose, Pearl Sevillana (left).

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At the far end of the bed is my newest rose, the Blushing Knock Out Rosa ‘Radyod’ (right) which holds her own between two holly shrubs and a white-blooming lilac, and blooms from early June through frost.

Now that you’ve seen my top June picks, it’s time to visit May Dreams Gardens, where Carol hosts Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day. There you’ll find many, many more gardens to visit.

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Rainy Connecticut for Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day

With my Connecticut gardens receiving soaking downpours – pushing three inches of rain since early yesterday morning – I have some soggy additions to the August 2011 Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day. Carol, at May Dreams Gardens hosts this garden-fest on the fifteenth of each month so garden bloggers from all over the world can share what’s blooming in their gardens.

Gomphrena and ageratum happily soak up the rain.

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Autumn Joy sedum will soon burst into pollinator-attracting blossoms.

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But phlox blossoms are putting on their final show.

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The classic white zinnia I started from seed are off to a late start but that’s okay … they will brighten the beds during late summer/early autumn.

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Hydrangea paniculata and buddleia would have a flurry of bee and butterfly activity if not for the rain.

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Just two days ago I caught the morning sun glinting off of the last of my Hemerocallis Hyperion. With such a sweet lemony scent, I hate to see it go.

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The new-to-my-garden Knock Out Rosa ‘Radyod’ has lived up to its promise to bloom all season. It took just a brief flowering break in July after delighting me with many flowers during early summer. More buds stand ready to open after this flower fades.

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Most of the Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Bailmer’ blossoms – an Endless Summer selection – have shaded to their late summer purple-blue tinge. But one large blossom shows off the early summer blue and the late summer tint.

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One of my favorite blossoms, scabiosa columbaria ‘Butterfly Blue’, has flowered since late spring. Deadheading is the key to keeping this perennial in steady bloom.

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Some flowers of an unknown variety of variegated hydrangea macrophylla still look fresh and cool blue.

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And, in spite of leaf-nibbles from hungry … and unwelcome … deer, plus weather fluctuations from hot and humid to cool and soggy, anemone blossoms started opening a week or so ago and will … Mother Nature willing … continue into September.

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That’s it from my zone 6a Connecticut gardens. Be sure to visit May Dreams Gardens to enjoy what other garden bloggers’ have shared.

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Blooms of July

Mid-summer blooms in my Connecticut (zone 6a) gardens stand defiant in the face of the hot July sun so on this Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day there’s much to share.

In the fenced garden, phlox steal the eye-level show. Blue Paradise fills the air with sweet scent.

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David’s Lavender grabs attention nearby.

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Scabiosa columbaria ‘Butterfly Blue’ show off a cool bluish-lavender tone against boxwood green.

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A trio of daylilies (Hemerocallis) put on quite a show of their own.

Catherine Woodbury on one side.

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Macbeth, the newest addition, opened her first blossom this year and will carry the opposite end of the daylily trio.

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Prairie Blue Eyes takes the middle spot of the trio.

Hemerocallis 'Prairie Blue Eye'

 

Hemerocallis ‘Hyperion’ waft a sweet lemony scent along the opposite bed as they wrestle attention away from blooming hosta.

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At the very end of the long perennial bed Echinacea ‘Green Envy’ is just starting to strut its stuff.

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Japanese beetles will be its biggest enemy. Cousin Echinacea may indeed be green with envy as they, located in unfenced beds, must also ward off deer.

A mid-June deer stroll left some of the unprotected Echinacea without buds, but most survived. A few White Swan avoided deer but they, along with the common purple coneflower, seem to be favorites of an unknown munching bug.

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The largest stand of common purple coneflower managed to avoid all deer munching this year … whew!

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Elsewhere in the yard Black-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia) peeks out from behind a blue spruce …

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and otherwise plays in wild abandon with an unknown variety of Veronica.

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Now head over to May Dreams Gardens to see what Carol, the originator of Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day, and others are sharing from their gardens. It’s worth the trip.

Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2011 Joene Hendry