Tag Archive for gardening in Connecticut

Dreaming of “warmer” white

Though the calendar is close to flipping the page to April and the season is officially spring, winter’s white stuff remains the key element in Connecticut’s outside landscape. With more snow falling today, it’s time to dream of the “warmer” white that will … yes, will … come with warmer weather.

amaryllis 'Christmas Gift'

amaryllis ‘Christmas Gift’

amaryllis 'Christmas Gift' close up

amaryllis ‘Christmas Gift’ close up

Inside warmth allows amaryllis blooms to brighten spirits.

This ‘Christmas Gift’ amaryllis bloomed late this year.

Her blossom just passed, but gave a hint of the warm white blooms her hardier cousins promise.

Spring blooming bulbs are trying to fill the void of outdoor blooms – they’re slowly peeking out of the soil and, before long will open into this.

small cupped narcissi

small cupped narcissi

double narcissus

double narcissus

Soon to be followed by tiny white violets dotting the lawn.

white violets

white violets

Lilacs filling the air with scent.

white lilacs

white lilacs

Siberian iris 'White Swirl'

Siberian iris ‘White Swirl’

Alpine strawberry blossom

Alpine strawberry blossom

Siberian iris and little Alpine strawberry flowers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sanguinaria canadensis

Sanguinaria canadensis

Lily-of-the-Valley

Lily-of-the-Valley.

Bloodroot and Lily of the Valley.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peonies

Peony in bloom

Peony in bloom

and pinks.

Dianthus deltoides 'Arctic Fire'

Dianthus deltoides ‘Arctic Fire’

Bearded iris

bearded iris

bearded iris

and viburnum branches loaded in flowers.

Viburnum plicatum 'Mariessii'

Viburnum plicatum ‘Mariessii’

Lacy white astilbe blossoms will play with big blue hydrangea blooms.

Astilbe and hydrangea

Astilbe and hydrangea

Shasta daisy with gomphrena and ageratum

Shasta daisy with gomphrena and ageratum

white zinnia

white zinnia

Then shasta daisy and white zinnia will carry warmer whites through the summer months.

 

What “warmer” white blossoms help warm the inner gardener in you during early spring snows?

 

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Welcome Spring?

The calendar shows today as the first full day of Spring 2015 but, outside, Old Man Winter is doing its best to cover all evidence of Spring. Still, even with another three inches of fresh snow covering the ground, gardeners welcome spring.

As the season officially turned to Spring last evening at 6:45 pm, snow was falling. It doesn’t look very spring-like outside this morning.

The first full day of Spring in south-central Connecticut

The first full day of Spring in south-central Connecticut

But yesterday, during an early morning walk I found hints of Spring.

Tete-a tete narcissi barely peeking out of the ground

Tete-a tete narcissi barely peeking out of the ground

The few narcissi bulbs not still buried deep under snow cover were peeking out of the ground. I call this hope and, after looking back at last year’s progress, these sprouts are only slightly smaller than on the first day of Spring last year.

Yep … hope.

More hope shows inside, under lights, where basil seedlings have sprouted.

basil seedlings

basil seedlings

They have a way to go before they are large enough to flavor meals, but these tiny plants bring hope.

For this gardener, one of the best ways to maintain hope while waiting for spring temperatures to actually arrive is to plant seeds. If you need a boost to start some of your own seeds, read my seed starting process.

Grow a seed … believe in the future.

And … welcome Spring even when the outdoor landscape is draped in white.

Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2015 Joene Hendry

Monitoring snow melt

With just five days since our last snow fall it’s been great to be able to watch mounds of snow melt away. The sand crane statue is perfect for monitoring snow melt … much more interesting than a common yardstick.

The last snowstorm, March 5th – hoping it really is our last – added another 7″ of snow on top of the drifts and piles built up this winter. Overall, the 67″ of snow that’s fallen during the winter of 2014-2015 on my south-central Connecticut gardens is not an unusual amount. During the 2013-2014 winter our snowfall total was about 66″. These two more recent winters brought much less than the 82″ of snowfall measured during the 2012-2013 winter.

I much prefer a snowy winter to one that’s just cold and gray. Snow gives the landscape a totally different look and brings such interesting highlights to shrubs and tree forms. Still, this winter the snow seems so much deeper. The bulk of it fell in about one month’s time and it’s been remarkably cold. February 2015 was the coldest on record in Connecticut, which prevented snow melt and allowed snow piles and drifts to grow and grow.

Snow piles and drifts were so deep by March 5 that my sand crane statue was nearly buried.

Sand crane statue barely showing above the snow.

Sand crane statue barely showing above the snow.

Now, five days later, its neck is completely exposed and its river rock body is showing enough to capture more of March’s warming sun.

snow finally melting around the snow crane statue

snow finally melting around the snow crane statue

Each day we get a bit closer to seeing bare ground. I suspect crocus and other spring-blooming bulbs are perched just below the surface ready to pounce into bloom as soon as the snow blanket melts away. Before long … just a few months from now … the same sand crane will be surrounded by greenery, blossoms, and buzzing insects.

Sand crane statue with balloon flowers

Sand crane statue with balloon flowers

And everything in my garden – myself included – will sigh, “Ahhhhh!”

 

Digiprove sealCopyright secured by Digiprove © 2015 Joene Hendry