Seed dispersal with gusto

Some plants passively count on wind, creatures, or water for seed dispersal. Other plants attack seed dispersal with gusto, creating a type of seed pod firework display.

The video below shows seed dispersal with gusto, a process I’ve observed this many times in my Connecticut gardens.

Unfortunately, the video only refers to the plants by common name – violets, touch-me-nots, squirting cucumbers. Searching for information using only common plant names can lead to confusion as common names may vary from gardener to gardener and region to region. For anyone looking to add featured plants to their garden, the addition of botanical names would have been helpful.

In Connecticut, touch-me-nots are also called jewelweed. The Connecticut Botanical Society (CBS) lists two native species: jewelweed or spotted touch-me-not is Impatiens capensis, while pale touch-me-not or pale jewelweed is Impatiens pallida.

white violets

white violets-a CT native using seed dispersal with gusto

CBS also lists many species of violets, most in the Viola family such as the common blue violet (Viola sororia) and small white or northern white violet (Viola pallens). By contrast, CBS does not list poisonous-when-ingested squirting cucumbers (Ecballium elaterium), native to Mediterranean regions.

Seed dispersal with gusto is a fun phenomenon for desired plants. In my landscape, common blue violets add interest and color to the lawn, where I encourage their spread, and where they attract some of the earliest emerging pollinators. But the same blue violets require annual control in perennial beds to prevent them from taking over.

Two of Connecticut’s weedy invasives hairy bitter-cress (Cardamine hirsuta) and garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) need only a slight touch to blast mature seeds in all directions, making them formidable weed pests. Hairy bitter-cress blooms during very early spring going from flower to mature seed in just a few days, and re-blooms late-summer to fall from these broadcast seeds. If not caught before narrow seed pods dry, plant removal is impossible without spreading seeds. Garlic mustard is similarly robust in seed dispersal.

Informed gardeners can use seed dispersal knowledge to their advantage by allowing desired perennials to go to seed, or preventing unwanted weeds or perennials from doing the same.

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2 comments for “Seed dispersal with gusto

  1. January 13, 2016 at 1:41 pm

    Fascinating video, I really appreciated the supporting information in your post.

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