Native Plants from the Connecticut Conservation Districts

One way to improve the diversity of the plant offerings in your landscape is to plant natives. Native plants, shrubs and trees do a bang up job of attracting native insects which, in turn, help feed native birds and pollinators that will improve yields of edible and ornamental flora in your gardens.

Read more on native plants in In Search of Natives, an article I wrote for Connecticut Gardener.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAConnecticut gardeners have a wonderful opportunity to purchase many native plants, shrubs and trees through the various Connecticut Conservation Districts’ plant sales. Follow this link and click on the district in which you are located to find the plant sale specifics of your region.

Those of you in my district, The Connecticut River Coastal Conservation District, can download the plant sale brochure here. There are many, difficult to locate, native shrubs and trees available in the brochure. Before ordering check out the photo/info database for each plant so you know their needs and characteristics. I’m quite impressed that they have Pagoda Dogwood (Cornus alternifolia) and American Wisteria (Wisteria frutescens ‘Amethyst Falls’) among the natives offered this year.

Proceeds from the plant sale support the many conservation and water quality programs offered by the Connecticut Conservation Districts. But don’t wait … orders must be received by April 1, 2013.

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Sights from the 2013 Boston Flower and Garden Show

It’s a dreary day in Connecticut, a good day to revisit the sights my camera caught at the 2013 Boston Flower and Garden Show.

With spring just around the corner … yes, it’s around the corner in spite of the cold and snowy weather that continues to hang on … it’s good to peruse different design ideas. You never know what might get your design juices flowing.

A living wall of herbs.

Not exactly a low maintenance feature, but cool, nonetheless.

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Winter to spring.

I’ve seen many flower and garden show displays yet I don’t recall ever seeing one showing a winter landscape. Imaging how useful a display would be if it showed the same landscape in all four seasons.

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Fun playhouses for kids and chickens.

The kid playhouse (left) looked like so much fun … I wanted to climb into it. Lucky chickens in the coop on the right!

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Liquid fire?

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A unique waterfall.

Look to the left of the pergola where water is sheeting from the roof.

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Oriental flare.

The dragon atop the arch is most interesting.

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Zen-like simplicity.

Note the use of corrugated metal as the background.

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Metal features.

These rods mimic the structure of a dormant woody shrub.

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The displays were intriguing, but the vendors were fewer than I expected.

 

Still, I found a perfect new addition for my garden.

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Meet Sandy, a crested crane standing about three feet tall on my front porch for now. He will find a more permanent home once winter lets go of my gardens.

Sandy is a creation of Francis Metal Works, craftsmen who create these wonderful statues from Minnesota fieldstone and powder coated iron.  Check out some of their other creations … ducks, herons, ibis, and pelicans. At the show they also had spiders and turtles. All were fantastic. It was difficult to restrain from adopting a few of Sandy’s show mates.

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