Morning light on Red Fountain Grass

Red Fountain grass, botanical name Pennisetum rubrum, in morning light.

Dew enhanced Pennisetum rubrum in morning light

Dew enhanced Pennisetum rubrum in morning light

Use this as an annual in Connecticut gardens – it is hardy only to Zone 9 – where it can be enjoyed in morning or late afternoon light.

Red fountain grass

Red fountain grass

Pennisetum rubrum is perfect for containers, as a stand alone or in a group. Foliage is primarily dark red, hence the name rubrum, but has tinges of green and reaches heights from 3-4 feet.

Close up of Red fountain grass, also known as Purple fountain grass.

Close up of Red fountain grass, also known as Purple fountain grass.

The fronds sway gently with the slightest breeze. Simply plant it, water it, and enjoy.

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Morning garden -blooms, butterflies, and hummingbirds

July gardens, filled with blooms, butterflies, and hummingbirds, provide a sharp contrast to the snow-covered landscape of January. With so many blooms and so much to see, it’s easy to spend lots of time just observing, and soaking up as much summer as possible.

These beds in my south-central Connecticut gardens, thrive in a sunny, fenced-from-deer back yard. Iris, white lilacs, azalea, early blooming clematis, and spring bulbs provide the first wave of color, then roses, spirea, lavender, and scabiosa take over. But now, daylilies, phlox, hosta and daisies step in while roses take their early summer rest and lavender nears the end of its flowering.

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Perennial border-1

Early, before the sun becomes too hot and pollinator activity is still somewhat low, is the time to remove spent blossoms and pull a few weeds.

Fritalaria? on a daisy

Fritillary? on a daisy

 

Once the sun rises higher in the sky, blooms become a flurry of activity.

Butterflies flutter from daisy flowers to …

 

 

 

Fritillary enjoy zinnia blossoms

Fritillary enjoy zinnia blossoms

zinnia flowers …

then move to phlox and coneflowers.

 

 

 

In another section of the gardens tall yellow daylilies waft a sweet, lemony scent as they mask the netting concoction (supported by the tall green stakes), placed to keep birds from eating all the ripening blueberries (not visible in this photo).

Perennial border-2

Perennial border-2

Nearby lavender, nearing the end of flowering, is still abuzz with bees.The favored feeding spot for hummingbirds right now is the long hosta border that sits below the elevated deck … a perfect place to enjoy morning coffee and watch the show.

Hummingbird enjoying hosta flowers.

Hummingbird enjoying hosta flowers.