March 2014 – a problem child to its last day

We’ve come to expect the month of March to go out like a lamb, but March 2014 continues to be a  problem child right to its last day.

It dropped a surprize sleet/snow mix – perhaps as an early April Fools joke – over much of Connecticut today.

Such weather, after the calendar start of spring, brings moans and groans. I almost joined in with my own complaint, then I took a walk to see how the crocus held up to the unwelcome precipitation.

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The crocus didn’t seem to mind the snow.

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Whether with friends or alone, each stood in defiance of the frozen stuff that fell from the sky.

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It’s tough to moan and grown when such simple beauty in right under your nose … another lesson learned from the garden.

So long, March. You tried to hold spring back, but she’s budding out in spite of your chill.

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It’s Spring!

Snow cover remains in shady spots and where plows piled it high, and temperatures still hover below normal for this time of year in my Connecticut gardens, but neither can stop the march of time. Once clocks pass 12:57 pm today we can all officially rejoice that it’s Spring!

This morning, I took my camera for a quick walk to capture the small hints that bulbs are awakening.

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Tete-a-tete narcissi peek up through still dormant thyme.

Though deer usually do not nibble on narcissi, I have to protect these Tete-a-tetes every year as very hungry deer, craving for a green meal, have nibbled on these early-emerging shoots.

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See below how they looked during a previous spring? This image is what reminds me to now cover them each night. Good thing … this morning, as the sun was just illuminating the garden  where the Tete-a-tetes grow, I spotted a deer nosing around.

The Tete-a tetes are the only narcissi resident deer bother. I’ve provided plenty of opportunities for them to munch on the early shoots of other types of narcissus bulbs,

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but deer leave these alone.

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As I wandered around to the front beds, where the sun warms the soil the earliest, birds of all types sang from the trees.

They know it’s spring, too. Their songs are as welcome as the bloom of this crocus.

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Welcome … spring!

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Indoor beauties – March 2014 Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day

Winter still has a good hold on my Connecticut garden, allowing only brief hints of temperatures and blooms to come. So, instead of showing the one or two crocus buds or the green shoots of the Tete-a-tetes shyly peeking through the soil, I’m focusing on indoor beauties for this Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day.

A lovely deep maroon cyclamen has greeted me each morning for the last couple of months. Lately it’s been joined by a small echeveria in bloom. Individually these two houseplants hold their own. Together they form a wonderful contrast in leaf and blossom shape, color, and form.

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Close up views show the delicacy of the echeveria bloom.

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I’m anxious for spring weather to replace winter’s cold, and I will thoroughly enjoy scrolling through the photos many other gardeners share at May Dreams Gardens  this Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day. It must be warmer somewhere!

But while I wait … impatiently at times … for spring’s warmth and the burst of bloom that will emerge from the ground, I’ll take time to enjoy the simple beauty of this indoor plant combination.

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