Morning light on Red Fountain Grass

Red Fountain grass, botanical name Pennisetum rubrum, in morning light.

Dew enhanced Pennisetum rubrum in morning light

Dew enhanced Pennisetum rubrum in morning light

Use this as an annual in Connecticut gardens – it is hardy only to Zone 9 – where it can be enjoyed in morning or late afternoon light.

Red fountain grass

Red fountain grass

Pennisetum rubrum is perfect for containers, as a stand alone or in a group. Foliage is primarily dark red, hence the name rubrum, but has tinges of green and reaches heights from 3-4 feet.

Close up of Red fountain grass, also known as Purple fountain grass.

Close up of Red fountain grass, also known as Purple fountain grass.

The fronds sway gently with the slightest breeze. Simply plant it, water it, and enjoy.

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4 comments for “Morning light on Red Fountain Grass

  1. September 2, 2015 at 9:17 pm

    I’ve never been good at figuring out how to integrate ornamental grasses into my garden, but I love the idea of using this in a container. Thanks for the suggestion!

    • September 3, 2015 at 8:06 am

      Jean, I’ve used ornamental grasses for years and have learned that miscanthus and some others easily reseed. I no longer recommend planting miscanthus in my area but, with mine so mature at this point, I hesitate to totally replace those planted as a screen along one area of our pool fence. Now I deadhead all miscanthus grasses and burn the seed heads in an outdoor fire pit. This has limited reseeding and still allows us to enjoy the privacy screen they create.

  2. September 3, 2015 at 12:29 am

    Ornamental grasses can be such a wonderful addition adding contrast and texture to the garden…Your photos are pretty spectacular, love how you used the lighting in your shots.

    • September 3, 2015 at 8:07 am

      Thanks, Charlie. I have a wonderful photography instructor … my husband.

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